Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘speech’

Earlier, I praised the emotional aspect of Hillary’s last night speech and it’s effect on Barack Obama’s electoral prospects.

As for the actual political content though, my thoughts are closer to Matt Welch’s, whose excellent take on it I highly recommend.

Read Full Post »

She was poignant, she was stylish and she electrified the audience. And she came out strong for Barack Obama.

I have never liked Hillary much. I didn’t like her manipulative side that she displayed during the primaries and I detest her nanny-state approach to government. I was more than relieved when it became certain that she would not be the nominee. But credit where credit’s due — she was very good tonight. She not only exceeded my expectations with her choice of words but she said them in a fashion that sounded both emotional and sincere. I suspect that many Republican strategists are kicking themselves right now.

Whoever wins in this election, this speech has ensured that no one will say Hillary didn’t try hard enough.

[Update] Andrew Sullivan isn’t impressed:

To my mind, however, it was an average performance, not a slashing attack on the Bush-Cheney record, nor a rousing rallying cry for Obama, nor a very insightful analysis of the country’s problems. There was virtually nothing about foreign policy. She did what she had to do, tell her voters to back Obama. But she gave nothing more.

Read Full Post »

Andrew Sullivan is overwhelmed:

One of the best, most moving, intimate, rousing, humble, and beautiful speeches I’ve heard from a convention platform. Maybe she should be running for president. You don’t need any commentary from me. This was a home-run. And sincere. Thank God that in the end, the truth struggles out there.

Dave Wiegel agrees:

There are a lot of people tonight who used to dislike Michelle Obama.

It was a good speech, no doubt. Especially the part at the end with the kids. Aren’t they adorable?

Here’s the video:

Read Full Post »

The full text of the speech, as delivered in the town of Independence, Missouri, earlier today.

Read Full Post »

One of the greatest formative experiences of my life preceded Harry Potter, though it informed much of what I subsequently wrote in those books. This revelation came in the form of one of my earliest day jobs. Though I was sloping off to write stories during my lunch hours, I paid the rent in my early 20s by working in the research department at Amnesty International’s headquarters in London.

There in my little office I read hastily scribbled letters smuggled out of totalitarian regimes by men and women who were risking imprisonment to inform the outside world of what was happening to them. I saw photographs of those who had disappeared without trace, sent to Amnesty by their desperate families and friends. I read the testimony of torture victims and saw pictures of their injuries. I opened handwritten, eye-witness accounts of summary trials and executions, of kidnappings and rapes.

Many of my co-workers were ex-political prisoners, people who had been displaced from their homes, or fled into exile, because they had the temerity to think independently of their government. Visitors to our office included those who had come to give information, or to try and find out what had happened to those they had been forced to leave behind.

I shall never forget the African torture victim, a young man no older than I was at the time, who had become mentally ill after all he had endured in his homeland. He trembled uncontrollably as he spoke into a video camera about the brutality inflicted upon him. He was a foot taller than I was, and seemed as fragile as a child. I was given the job of escorting him to the Underground Station afterwards, and this man whose life had been shattered by cruelty took my hand with exquisite courtesy, and wished me future happiness.

And as long as I live I shall remember walking along an empty corridor and suddenly hearing, from behind a closed door, a scream of pain and horror such as I have never heard since. The door opened, and the researcher poked out her head and told me to run and make a hot drink for the young man sitting with her. She had just given him the news that in retaliation for his own outspokenness against his country’s regime, his mother had been seized and executed.

Every day of my working week in my early 20s I was reminded how incredibly fortunate I was, to live in a country with a democratically elected government, where legal representation and a public trial were the rights of everyone.

Link.

Read Full Post »

In Germany, they first came for the communists, and I didn’t speak up because I wasn’t a communist.
Then they came for the Jews, and I didn’t speak up because I wasn’t a Jew.
Then they came for the trade unionists, and I didn’t speak up because I wasn’t a trade unionist.
Then they came for the Catholics and I didn’t speak up because I wasn’t a Catholic.
Then they came for me — and by that time there was nobody left to speak up.

Martin Niemoller

Read Full Post »

Alas, I cannot give a more considered response right now as I have to get on the road. But I do want to say that this searing, nuanced, gut-wrenching, loyal, and deeply, deeply Christian speech is the most honest speech on race in America in my adult lifetime. It is a speech we have all been waiting for for a generation. Its ability to embrace both the legitimate fears and resentments of whites and the understandable anger and dashed hopes of many blacks was, in my view, unique in recent American history.

The full post.

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »