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Posts Tagged ‘ron paul’

I forgot to post this earlier. Ron Paul on the floor of the US Congress:

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Ron Paul displays another example of the kind of bad judgement/position  that has ensured that I have never been his supporter. (Previous examples — his stands on abortion, immigration and international treaties, his practice of voting ‘no’, the newsletter scandal)

Yes, I am disappointed.

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I have never been a hardcore Ron Paul fan. Nonetheless, I found the video below touching, not just because it reminded me that I have much more in common with him than not, but also because it poignantly reflects the truth — more stark today than it has ever been — that truth-tellers can never be successful politicians.

(Hat Tip: Andrew Sullivan)

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If you, like me, think it is outrageous that the US government tells you that you may not indulge in internet gambling, you can call, fax or email House Financial Services Committee and let your views be known. For more details, click here.

If you decide to act, please do so by Tuesday. That’s when the house will consider the bill, co-authored by Barney Frank and Ron Paul, which aims to remove some of the most draconian aspects of the internet gambling ban. Here is what they have to say about the matter.

“These regulations are impossible to implement without placing a significant burden on the payments system and financial institutions, and while I do disagree with the underlying objective of the Act, I believe that even those who agree with it ought to be concerned about the regulations’ impact,” said Rep. Frank.

“The ban on Internet gambling infringes upon two freedoms that are important to many Americans: the ability to do with their money as they see fit, and the freedom from government interference with the Internet. The regulations and underlying bill also force financial institutions to act as law enforcement officers. This is another pernicious trend that has accelerated in the aftermath of the Patriot Act, the deputization of private businesses to perform intrusive enforcement and surveillance functions that the federal government is unwilling to perform on its own,” said Rep. Paul.

Indeed.

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A nice article in the New York Times on Ron Paul and his passionate supporters.

Mr. Paul was supposed to be a memory by now. But in the Oregon primary last week, he won 15 percent of the vote, and the campaign appears to be growing into something beyond a conventional protest campaign. Some supporters have helped turn the outspoken congressman’s campaign into a colorful, loud sideshow with their guerrilla marketing tactics — self-penned Ron Paul anthems on YouTube, a Ron Paul blimp, T-shirts that portray Mr. Paul as a world-historical icon like Che Guevara.

Also read my old post on the Ron Paul campaign.

(Link via Andrew Sullivan)

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The goal of Paulville.org it to establish gated communities containing 100% Ron Paul supporters and/ or people that live by the ideals of freedom and liberty.

Link.

I am curious — will a Paulville resident have the freedom, for instance, to question the ideals of freedom and liberty? What if a resident has a change of heart after he is admitted to Paulville and decides he no longer believes in those truths. Will he be allowed to stay on?

Of course, any community that encourages libertarianism to flourish is a good idea. I just hope they do it the right way.

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One advantage of subscribing to the print edition of a magazine is that you get the good stuff early. There was a lot of good stuff in the current edition of Reason and now that the articles are finally on-line, I can share some of them with the rest of you.

This illustratedstrip by Peter Bagge is a highly entertaining take on the presidential contenders. This was around the time that the newsletter scandal broke, and Ron Paul is a major figure.

Is the fourth great awakening coming to an end, Ronald Bailey asks, in a long but highly readable essay about moral tectonics and the major shifts in public opinion in American history.

Jacob Sullum reviews two recent books on the drug war and comments on the “arbitrary distinctions at the root of prohibition”.

And here are some, umm, interesting quotes.

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