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Posts Tagged ‘photography’

Sunset at Rigi

Sunset at Rigi

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Hiking the fairyland loop

Panorama

Taken on April 19 in Bryce Canyon, Utah.

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posted earlier about the Elane Photography case. The New Mexico Human Rights commission issued its opinion today, holding Elane Photography guilty of discrimination. As Eugene Volokh discusses here, the breadth of the decision is astounding and ostensibly covers other businesses of a similar nature. For instance, freelance writers — by the same logic employed by the commission — can be compelled to write things contrary to their religious beliefs.

As this case makes clear, the attack on freedom of speech from anti-discrimination laws is current and real. And it is getting worse.

(Link via The Volokh Conspiracy)

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Following Mommy

Taken yesterday, at the San Diego seaworld.

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In America, you have freedom of expression and freedom of association, except when you don’t. Since the passage of the Civil Rights Act, one does not really have the right to decide who one hires, or rents out one’s apartment to, allows inside one’s restaurant, or does business with. If you refuse to deal with someone commercially because of their race, sex, age, sexual orientation or other protected characteristic, the government will punish you.

Yet the Civil Rights Act, in its original form, did allow significant exceptions for activities of a private or expressive nature. Much of that is no longer true. Courts are interpreting the provisions of anti-discrimination laws in ever broader terms. One no longer, for instance, has the right to decide who one lives with.  And now, it appears that one cannot even choose what one photographs. 

Elane Huguenin refused to photograph a client’s same-sex commitment ceremonies, and the New Mexico Human Rights Commission decided that this violated state antidiscrimination law. Elane has to pay over $6000 in attorney costs.

Eugene Volokh has a series of excellent posts regarding this particular incident, which I highly recommend. He argues that since photography is an art, this judgement violates the first amendment. I agree. However, even if that were not the case, I think there is no rationale for an anti-discrimination law that forces someone to offer their service to others — especially when the act of discrimination does not significant restrict the client’s ability to obtain that service (I am sure there were many other photographers who would have been willing to do the job for this particular client).

Ultimately, all these laws boil down to an intent to strip individuals of their right to make ‘immoral’ choices and use the power of the state to force this; and that, in my view is the ultimate immorality.

(Hat tip to The Volokh Conspiracy, where I saw this story)

Previous posts in this blog on anti-discrimination law:

Anti-discrimination laws and freedom

The need to defend the rights of bigots

 

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