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Posts Tagged ‘medical’

Charlie Lynch was found guilty in a federal court today. He faces a minimum of five years in prison.

I blogged about the Charlie Lynch case here. Reason Hit and Run has an extensive coverage on the matter, which I highly recommend.

I don’t have much to say. It’s one of those deeply jarring events — so unjust and wrong that words are pretty nigh superfluous.

In the beginning of the last century, when my country was strugling for her independence, there were brave men and women who fought the good fight for all of us. Some of them went to prison, some died. Every war for freedom that has ever taken place has had its martyrs.

This is a war too, a war to end the most absurd war ever conceived. Charlie Lynch is not its first casualty, nor will he be the last. However, Charlie’s suffering will not be in vain, for every miscarriage of justice they commit strengthens our cause. In the end, the forces of reason and freedom will win, as they eventually must.

[Edit]: Do watch this video too.

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There are many good arguments libertarians put forward against the idea of mandating universal health insurance (either through single payer or a Massachusetts style measure).

It is morally wrong to coerce some people to disproportionately pay for others’ costs or to tell someone who decides to take his chance that he cannot do it.

A mandate would almost surely be accompanied by excessive regulation which would adversely affect medical research and the quality of healthcare provided.

It will encourage the passage of nanny-state laws designed to compel people to stay healthy.

Despite these flaws, it was assumed that such a measure would at least reduce medical costs and thus make life better for a lot of people. However it now appears that even this economic rationale does not hold good.

Of course, the linked article of course only looks only at the Massachusetts model but it seems extremely likely that the same problems will arise in any similar scheme.

So what’s the best solution? I don’t have a completely satisfactory answer; check out, however, Milton Friedman’s short essay on the topic.

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A poignant report about Ashley, the severely disabled child whose parents made the decision a year ago to keep her forever small in order to facilitate her care.

Her parents, who obviously love her deeply, took a decision that must have been very difficult, but in their eyes, correct. The issue of consent is irrelevant because Ashley’s mental development is equal to that of a six-month-old baby and she cannot talk. She will need the same amount of care her entire life and the two people giving it will be her parents. That is why I have no sympathy – or respect – for those who sit far away today and criticize them.

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