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Posts Tagged ‘health’

I have written enough in the past about Canada’s (usually successful) attempts to muzzle free speech and monitor thought crimes and enforce some kind of bizarre right to not get your feelings hurt.

But this latest proposed law takes policing your head to an entirely different level. I understand that the proposal has been spurred by Natasha Richardson’s tragic death, but that’s what makes it all the more scary; that so many people’s natural reaction to a tragedy is to clamor for more government regulation.

Considering the fact that ski helmets are fairly useless at speeds higher than 20 mph (an impact leads to a fatal collision of the brain with the inside of the skull, something no helmet can prevent), I wonder if they will next make a rule that declares Newton’s laws of motion illegal.

(Also read: On motorcycle helmet laws and freedom)

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Ashutosh points me to this fine article by Atul Gawande on healthcare reform in the US. While the overall viewpoint of the author is pragmatic liberal, the emphasis is definitely on the pragmatic — indeed, his insistence on the value of building upon existing institutions rather than attempting a drastic overhaul gives the piece a slightly Burkean conservative flavor. In any case, it is an article worth checking out, even if you, like me, don’t agree with much of what he says.

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I missed this post by Andrew Sullivan from a while back.

One reason I’m a conservative is the British National Health Service. Until you have lived under socialism, it sounds like a great idea. It isn’t misery – although watching my parents go through the system lately has been nerve-wracking – but there is a basic assumption. The government collective decides everything. You, the individual patient, and you, the individual doctor, are the least of their concerns. I prefer freedom and the market to rationalism and the collective. That’s why I live here.

Andrew, of course, is a British citizen, who was born and raised there but has been living in the US for a long time now, so his perspective is certainly worthwhile.

Now I’ll be the first to admit that this is mere anecdotal evidence which does not prove anything. Andrew Sullivan’s healthcare experience has been better in the US; there are obviously British citizens who prefer their system. However as long as we keep the anecdotal nature of this statistic in mind, there is nothing to lose by considering it. Indeed, I get the idea that a lot of dyed-in-the-wool liberals who have lived in the US all their life automatically assume that everyone who has lived in single payer prefers it. Quotes like these may at least help them open their minds to the truth.

For the truth is much deeper than that little quote by a popular blogger. Yes, the US healthcare system sucks in many ways. However any system of government mandated healthcare has fundamental drawbacks. Excessive regulation adversely affects medical research and the quality of healthcare provided. It encourages the passage of nanny-state laws designed to compel people to stay healthy. Even the claimed reduction in costs does not necessarily happen in all cases; see this article on the Massachusetts mandate. Above all there is a moral issue — a government mandate involves coercive takings and elimination of choice.

My personal preference leans towards “freedom and the market”, as Sullivan puts it. If the government has to be involved it should do so in the following ways:

1) Change the nature of regulation to light, smart ones designed to reduce costs (those associated with litigation, inefficient record keeping, bureaucratization, compliance with unnecessary rules), increase transparency/information disclosure and foster competition.

2) Replace Medicare etc. with a system of vouchers that can be spent on any health provider.

3) Retain one catastrophic government run health insurance system with a high deductible that would cover everyone in case of emergencies and other catastrophes and deal with the free-rider problem in those situations; eliminate all other government insurance schemes.

These measures are influenced by Milton Friedman’s views, espoused among other places in this article.

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We bring you, courtesy the great guys at CCF, the following awesome analysis:

Also read: Your health is my business. And please do not point out that what works for Olympic athletes will turn an average person into a hippo.

(Hat Tip: Reason Hit and Run)

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I found this article on Obama and voter preferences funny yet strangely depressing.

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This guy needs to loosen up. Someone get him a stiff drink!

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There are many good arguments libertarians put forward against the idea of mandating universal health insurance (either through single payer or a Massachusetts style measure).

It is morally wrong to coerce some people to disproportionately pay for others’ costs or to tell someone who decides to take his chance that he cannot do it.

A mandate would almost surely be accompanied by excessive regulation which would adversely affect medical research and the quality of healthcare provided.

It will encourage the passage of nanny-state laws designed to compel people to stay healthy.

Despite these flaws, it was assumed that such a measure would at least reduce medical costs and thus make life better for a lot of people. However it now appears that even this economic rationale does not hold good.

Of course, the linked article of course only looks only at the Massachusetts model but it seems extremely likely that the same problems will arise in any similar scheme.

So what’s the best solution? I don’t have a completely satisfactory answer; check out, however, Milton Friedman’s short essay on the topic.

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