Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘democratic convention’

This is how it looks in one of the most liberal cities of the most free country in the world.

(Hat Tip: The Agitator)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Not a great speech like some of his earlier ones but pretty good nevertheless. He did what he had to do.

Personally, I disliked quite a bit of the content, especially the economic populism at the beginning. But then, the speech was not aimed at me. I suspect that the democratic base and those who agree with Obama’s fundamentally collectivist worldview (‘moral obligation’, ‘mutual responsibility’, ‘service’) will adore it.

I will be surprised if he won over too many independents with today’s performance. But then, he doesn’t need to. This speech was designed to make all those Hillary-backers and temperamental left-liberals fall in line. Add his current level of support with the entire Democratic base uniting behind him and you are looking at a landslide victory.

Both in style and content, the speech got better as the night went on. The crowd went periodically crazy. Overall, an A-.

[EDIT 1]: Here’s Andrew Sullivan’s gushing reaction. I agree with him about the “unabashedly, unashamedly liberal” part. That is why libertarians will be mildly disappointed with this speech while those who agree with his worldview will lap it up. But yes, I will say this much, I will very very surprised if Obama loses this election after this.

[EDIT 2]: The part of the speech I liked best (emphasis mine):

Now, many of these plans will cost money, which is why I’ve laid out how I’ll pay for every dime – by closing corporate loopholes and tax havens that don’t help America grow. But I will also go through the federal budget, line by line, eliminating programs that no longer work and making the ones we do need work better and cost less – because we cannot meet twenty-first century challenges with a twentieth century bureaucracy.

And Democrats, we must also admit that fulfilling America’s promise will require more than just money. It will require a renewed sense of responsibility from each of us to recover what John F. Kennedy called our “intellectual and moral strength.” Yes, government must lead on energy independence, but each of us must do our part to make our homes and businesses more efficient. Yes, we must provide more ladders to success for young men who fall into lives of crime and despair. But we must also admit that programs alone can’t replace parents; that government can’t turn off the television and make a child do her homework; that fathers must take more responsibility for providing the love and guidance their children need.

Also, this line was great:

But the record’s clear: John McCain has voted with George Bush ninety percent of the time. Senator McCain likes to talk about judgment, but really, what does it say about your judgment when you think George Bush has been right more than ninety percent of the time? I don’t know about you, but I’m not ready to take a ten percent chance on change.

It was also good to hear him advocate for nuclear energy and talk of privacy as an important issue. Sadly, both of these were met with silence from the partisan crowd.

Unfortunately, as I said, there were too many jarring notes in the rest of the speech for a minarchist like me. For those interested, here’s a transcript.

Read Full Post »

The last time Obama had to give a speech to save his life, he delivered a tour-de-force. You could see it coming a mile away.

The trouble with Obama is that he is such a damn good orator that the expectations for tomorrow will be sky-high. Yet, he will need to surpass those expectations if he has to create a buzz, and will have to do it through content rather than soaring rhetoric because the latter is only going to reinforce the notion that he is an empty suit only good at words.

The last few weeks have seen the polls tighten to essentially a tie. Tomorrow is Obama’s call to shine. Well, he has done it before. Obama can be verbose and nuanced — too nuanced — in impromptu conversations and debates. However, he is the acknowledged master of the “big speech”. His greatest speeches — the 2002 one against the war, the 2004 speech at the convention, the race speech earlier this year, all came at big moments. So I’ll be tuning in tomorrow and expecting him to deliver.

Read Full Post »

She was poignant, she was stylish and she electrified the audience. And she came out strong for Barack Obama.

I have never liked Hillary much. I didn’t like her manipulative side that she displayed during the primaries and I detest her nanny-state approach to government. I was more than relieved when it became certain that she would not be the nominee. But credit where credit’s due — she was very good tonight. She not only exceeded my expectations with her choice of words but she said them in a fashion that sounded both emotional and sincere. I suspect that many Republican strategists are kicking themselves right now.

Whoever wins in this election, this speech has ensured that no one will say Hillary didn’t try hard enough.

[Update] Andrew Sullivan isn’t impressed:

To my mind, however, it was an average performance, not a slashing attack on the Bush-Cheney record, nor a rousing rallying cry for Obama, nor a very insightful analysis of the country’s problems. There was virtually nothing about foreign policy. She did what she had to do, tell her voters to back Obama. But she gave nothing more.

Read Full Post »

Andrew Sullivan is overwhelmed:

One of the best, most moving, intimate, rousing, humble, and beautiful speeches I’ve heard from a convention platform. Maybe she should be running for president. You don’t need any commentary from me. This was a home-run. And sincere. Thank God that in the end, the truth struggles out there.

Dave Wiegel agrees:

There are a lot of people tonight who used to dislike Michelle Obama.

It was a good speech, no doubt. Especially the part at the end with the kids. Aren’t they adorable?

Here’s the video:

Read Full Post »