Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘cricinfo’

Soumya Bhattacharya in a Cricinfo article says that Indians are racist.

I broadly agree with the contention, however I find his examples rather weak. There are several issues that interplay here and it is disappointing to see them mussed up haphazardly – an aesthetic preference for lighter skin tones cannot, for instance, be equated with a moral belief in white supremacy. 

He also mandates, with the cliched rationale of this being a ‘global village’ , that Indians should modify their speech and idioms so that they align with current Western European and American standards of politically correct expression. Careless choice of words and a truly racist attitude are not the same and the world would be a sorrier place indeed if more nations were to jump onto the political correctness bandwagon.

Read Full Post »

Tim de Lisle has a piece in Cricinfo where he says that sledging without an obvious skin-colour dimension is often as offensive as racial sledging. I agree. However, his solution to the conundrum is to ban all sledging. Mine, as I wrote yesterday, is to allow it.

Read Full Post »

Siddhartha Vaidyanathan, in an excellent article on Cricinfo, says that Dravid’s painstaking innings and the subsequent Indian batting collapse is just the latest evidence for an old truth: the wait-and-watch approach does not work against Australia.

Sixteen years ago Sanjay Manjrekar came to Australia as India’s best batsman. He had enjoyed a wonderful series in Pakistan and possessed the technique to counter any kind of bowling. He ended the five Tests without a single half-century and was never the same force since.

Four years back he revisited that trip. “I spent quite a lot of time at the crease, and never once felt uncomfortable,” he wrote in Wisden Asia Cricket. “My weakness was that I didn’t have the game to score off good balls. So I’d spend two hours scoring 30 before a good ball would get me. If I had managed to hit a few more fours, I could perhaps have got 60 in that time. The wait-and-watch approach is never going to be profitable in Australia. To succeed as a batsman, you should be able to create scoring opportunities, because there is little point in waiting for loose balls which never come.”

 

Read Full Post »