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Posts Tagged ‘bush’

No, I don’t know that atheists should be considered as citizens, nor should they be considered patriots. This is one nation under God…. Yes, I support the separation of church and state. I’m just not very high on atheists.

George H. W. Bush on Aug 27, 1987.

The greatest freedom we have or one of the greatest freedoms is the right to worship the way you see fit. On the other hand, I don’t see how you can be president at least from my perspective, how you can be president, without a relationship with the Lord.

George W. Bush on Jan 10, 2005.

For we know that our patchwork heritage is a strength, not a weakness. We are a nation of Christians and Muslims, Jews and Hindus – and non-believers.

Barack Obama on Jan 20, 2009.

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If true, this exchange between Sarkozy and Putin is astounding. Click here for the link.

With Russian tanks only 30 miles from Tbilisi on Aug. 12, Sarkozy told Putin that the world would not accept the overthrow of Georgia, Levitte said.

“I am going to hang Saakashvili by the balls,” Putin replied.

Sarkozy responded: “Hang him?”

“Why not? The Americans hanged Saddam Hussein,” Putin said.

Sarkozy replied, using the familiar “tu”: “Yes but do you want to end up like (President) Bush?”

Putin was briefly lost for words, then said: “Ah, you have scored a point there.”

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One of the great tragedies of modern USA, particularly seen in the modern Republican party, is its disdain for intellectualism and love for dumbing down. Do you pronounce foreign words correctly? It’s a liability. Eat aragula? Terrible! Skeptical about the existence of God? Kiss your chances of ever getting elected to office goodbye.

On the other hand, if you believe in creationism and are able to say the phrase “Joe-six-pack” faster than your predecessor can yell “nucular”, you have a good chance of getting nominated for the Vice-Presidency. And wait, you actually don’t give a hoot what researchers think? Congratulations, you are President.

(‘Pock-i-stahn’ Hat Tip: The Agitator)

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“I don’t care what somebody on some college campus says.”

— President George W. Bush, on hearing last week that more than 200 eminent economists had signed a letter expressing concern about the White House’s proposed bailout plan.

(Hat Tip: The Agitator)

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Bush likes booty

This is one classy pic.

(Hat Tip: Andrew Sullivan)

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Dean Christopher Edley of Berkeley responds to the John Yoo controversy:

While serving in the Department of Justice, Professor John Yoo wrote memoranda that officials used as the legal basis for policies concerning detention and interrogation techniques in our efforts to combat terrorism. Both the subject and his reasoning are controversial, leading the New York Times (editorial, April 4), the National Lawyers’ Guild, and hundreds of individuals from around the world to criticize or at least question Professor Yoo’s continuing employment at UC Berkeley School of Law. As dean, but speaking only for myself, I offer the following explanation, although with no expectation that it will be completely satisfying to anyone.

Professor Yoo began teaching at Berkeley Law in 1993, received tenure in 1999, and then took a leave of absence to work in the Bush Administration. He returned in 2004, and remains a very successful teacher and prolific (though often controversial) scholar. Because this is a public university, he enjoys not only security of employment and academic freedom, but also First Amendment and Due Process rights.

It seems we do need regular reminders: These protections, while not absolute, are nearly so because they are essential to the excellence of American universities and the progress of ideas. Indeed, in Berkeley’s classrooms and courtyards our community argues about the legal and moral issues with the intensity and discipline these crucial issues deserve. Those who prefer to avoid these arguments—be they left or right or lazy—will not find Berkeley or any other truly great law school a wholly congenial place to study. For that we make no apology.

Does what Professor Yoo wrote while not at the University somehow place him beyond the pale of academic freedom today? Had this been merely some professor vigorously expounding controversial and even extreme views, we would be in a familiar drama with the usual stakes. Had that professor been on leave marching with Nazis in Skokie or advising communists during the McCarthy era, reasonable people would probably find that an easier case still. Here, additional things are obviously in play. Gravely so.

My sense is that the vast majority of legal academics with a view of the matter disagree with substantial portions of Professor Yoo’s analyses, including a great many of his colleagues at Berkeley. If, however, this strong consensus were enough to fire or sanction someone, then academic freedom would be meaningless.

Assuming one believes as I do that Professor Yoo offered bad ideas and even worse advice during his government service, that judgment alone would not warrant dismissal or even a potentially chilling inquiry. As a legal matter, the test here is the relevant excerpt from the “General University Policy Regarding Academic Appointees,” adopted for the 10-campus University of California by both the system-wide Academic Senate and the Board of Regents:

Types of unacceptable conduct: … Commission of a criminal act which has led to conviction in a court of law and which clearly demonstrates unfitness to continue as a member of the faculty. [Academic Personnel Manual sec. 015]

This very restrictive standard is binding on me as dean, but I will put aside that shield and state my independent and personal view of the matter. I believe the crucial questions in view of our university mission are these: Was there clear professional misconduct—that is, some breach of the professional ethics applicable to a government attorney—material to Professor Yoo’s academic position? Did the writing of the memoranda, and his related conduct, violate a criminal or comparable statute?

Absent very substantial evidence on these questions, no university worthy of distinction should even contemplate dismissing a faculty member. That standard has not been met.

In an ideal world, what the dean said would be no more noteworthy than a routine enunciation of the basic principles of tolerance and freedom. Unfortunately, these principles are seldom remembered when dealing with opinions that differ from ours. McCathyism is no less abhorrent when applied against the ‘other side’; and for remembering this, the dean deserves praise. Bravo!

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“I believe that freedom is the deepest need of every human soul”
George. W. Bush

“Pornography exists everywhere, of course, but when it comes into societies in which it’s difficult for young men and women to get together and do what young men and women often like doing, it satisfies a more general need; and, while doing so, it sometimes becomes a kind of standard-bearer for freedom, even for civilization.”
Salman Rushdie

The Bush administration is in its last few months of office, but that is not stopping it from using taxpayers’ money to vigorously pursue its moral agenda.

I wrote earlier about the Karen Fletcher case. Now, federal prosecuters have charged a Los Angeles based adult movie producer with obscenity. If indicted, he faces $7 million in fines and jail time. Mind you, this is not a child porn case, but regular adult stuff, involving, meant for and sold only to adults.

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