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Archive for August 2nd, 2009

I find this passage from Arianna Huffington’s old article “Bernard Levin remembered” rather poignant for several  reasons. The italics are mine.

We started a relationship which was to last until the end of 1980, when I left London to move to New York. And he was, in many ways, the reason I left London. I was by then 30, still deeply in love with him, but longing to have children. He, on the other hand, never wanted to get married or have children. What was touching is that he saw this not as a badge of independence and freedom but as a character flaw, almost a handicap. As he wrote in 1983 in his book “Enthusiasms”, which he movingly dedicated to me even though we were no longer together: “What fear of revealing, of vulnerability, of being human, grips us so fiercely, and above all why? What is it that, down there in the darkness of the psyche, cries its silent No to the longing for Yes?” It was a No that often coincided with retreating into depression — the “black dog” that he described as “that dark lair where the sick soul’s desire for solitude turns into misanthropy.”

The whole article is in fact extremely touching, as I suspect such things often are. Read it.

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NY Times has an article today about BB&T, a bank that has been doing remarkably well in the crisis, and its charismatic chairman and former CEO, John A. Allison, who is an ardent Ayn Rand follower. Consider these:

• In his spare time, Mr. Allison travels the country making speeches about objectivism and his bank’s distinctive philosophy.

• His bank was forced to take bailout money, even though they did not want it. He returned the money with interest. He says “Everyone thinks we got some kind of subsidy, but it’s going to cost us about $250 million for money we didn’t want.”

• Under Mr. Allison, new executives were handed a copy of “Atlas Shrugged.” All employees get a 30-page pamphlet describing BB&T’s philosophy and values: reason, independent thinking and decisions based on facts.

• After the Supreme court upheld the right of local governments in 2005 to condemn private property and hand it to someone else for commercial development, he says, BB&T refused to make loans to developers who obtained property that way.

• BB&T spends about $5 million a year to finance teaching positions and research on “the moral foundations of capitalism.”

Read more here. Actually it is interesting to read the article for another reason too, for it displays the writer’s biases oh-so-clearly. He clearly finds this whole individualism thing something of a mild curiosity not worthy of too much respect and goes into some length to emphasize that serious philosophers consider Rand irrelevant. But then, he works at the NY Times.

(Previous posts on Ayn Rand’s philosophy here)

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